CREATING YOUR OWN REALITY


High performers, exceptional thinkers, don't see the world through the same lens as everyone else. They create the sense they see the world through. If a lens doesn't help them see the world the way they want to see it. Then they invent another. Have you heard of Yogi—the Major League Baseball player?


He was fired from countless jobs because he would clock out at three o' clock to find a ball game. It was the Depression, and Yogi had to help support his family. When he saw himself in the mirror, he didn't see a stock boy working for Pepsi-Cola, he saw a professional baseball player. His traditional Italian family was mystified by how he could pour so much energy into a game that wasn't paying the bills. Yogi however had a very clear vision of his place in the world; in fact, he was so eager and so committed to his dream of playing in the major league that he learned to play all nine positions.


At sixteen he tried out for his hometown team, the St. Louis Cardinals. His dedication didn't pay off. The Cardinal's owner, Branch Rickey, considered one of the greatest eyes for talent in the history of baseball, pulled Yogi aside and told him that he would never make it as a major leaguer. Hey wasn't big enough; he didn't have the natural ability. He didn't listen to Rickey. He stuck with his perception of his potential as a baseball player. A year later the Yankees signed him.


Yogi viewed his talents through a special lens and managed to get the Yankees to look through that same lens and see the promising young baseball player the Cardinals could not see. The best performers in very field tend to think about themselves and their careers with the same kind of filter—a commitment to their way of seeing the world and their special place in it that friends and family consider abnormal, if not a bit loony. Whether they ended up as famous entrepreneurs or heart surgeons, super salesmen or sport phenoms, then started out inclined to believe that they would excel long before the evidence was in. At an early age they were motivated to succeed and let nothing get in their way—neither the opinions of others, nor their derisive laughter, not the probabilities for failure or even failure itself.


AT AN EARLY AGE THEY WERE MOTIVATED TO SUCCEED AND LET NOTHING GET IN THEIR WAY—NEITHER THE OPINIONS OF OTHERS, NOR THEIR DERISIVE LAUGHTER, NOT THE PROBABILITIES FOR FAILURE OR EVEN FAILURE ITSELF.


When Michael Dell bought his first computer he immediately took it apart.

"I just wanted to see how it worked." Over the next few years young dell haunted local computer stores and even skipped school for days at a time to drive to industry conventions. He soon realized that though stores were selling IBM PC's for about three-thousand dollars, the actual components of the computer cost only six or seven hundred dollars. He began building custom computers for his friends, concluding that he could compete with the computer stores and still make a profit. Dell was in the computer business, and he hadn't yet graduated from high school. When he went off to college at the University of Texas he would hustle back to his dorm room after class to upgrade a few, which he would later sell to other students or faculty. The word got around, and soon doctors, lawyers, and businesspeople around Austin were dropping off their computers at Dell's dorm for an upgrade. He applied for a state vendor's license and immediately started underbidding Texas stores for state contracts on personal computers. Soon Dell was much too busy upgrading and selling computers to go to class.


Then Dell got a call from his parents.


His parents had been alerted by university authorities that their son's grades were tumbling and that the hadn't been attending class. They surprised Dell and immediately barked at him

"You've got to stop this computer stuff and concentrate on school". "Get your priorities straight. What do you want to do with your life?" Dell's answer was:


"I want to compete with IBM".


He saw an amazing business opportunity. He recognized that if he could get computers into the hands of every big and small business, every student, everyone, "it would become the most important device of this century". He decided not to divulge his dream "because they probably would have thought I was crazy. But, to me, the opportunity was clear." After only five years, Michael Dell, a college dropout, raised $35 million in an initial public offering of stock, bringing the market capitalization of Dell Computers to $85 million. Ten years later in 1999, the company Dell became the largest seller of personal-computers in the United States, racking up sales of more than $35 million a day—and thumping IBM.



Michael Dell and Yogi are one of those lucky people who seem to be born exceptional thinkers and are able to get us to see the world through their eyes.


Everyone can learn to think like that—provided they're willing to be considered "weird " or perhaps "unrealistic" by the rest of us.


In good health,


In good health,

Efrén Guerrero Rodríguez

Fortza Fit

High Performance Personal Training

Web| www.fortzafit.com

Ph| (619) 780-6968

Email |efren@fortza.fit



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